5 Biggest Controversial Common Sense about brew Tea, and Your Thought?

As more and more people opt to drink tea instead of other beverage, tea lovers tend to get to the bottom of the matter when it comes to tea lore, especially some subdivision about brewing, drinking, effects and the like, hoping there is an definite answer. However, that’s not the case with some of common senses about tea, including the 5 biggest controversies mentioned in this article.

What is the best tea set for brewing?

The most used tea wares are generally made of porcelain, pottery, glass and plastic. When steeping black tea and oolong tea, pottery or porcelain is usually regarded as the best choice due to its splendid ability to retain heat, which can produce better color, aroma and flavor. However, green tea is more matched with glass tea sets, through which you can clearly see the beauty of light fog, transparent greenness and tea buds.

Dose water quality impact the brewing of tea?

We can find the answer by citing Lu Yu’s The Classic of Tea . “For steeping tea, water of fountain is the best, followed by water of river, and well water is the worst.”

How to store tea leaves?

Tea has adopted advanced preservation technology, which ensures it can be kept for a long time. However, the best storage conditions include room temperature, no light and odorless environment. To prevent tea from absorbing odors, remember not to place tea beside soap, perfume, cigarette and the like.

How much tea per day?

There is not a strict limit on how much tea one should drink per day. Generally speaking, a healthy adult with a habit of drinking tea is recommended with 6 to 8 grams for steeping twice or third times; labor workers could drink 20g tea; pregnant women and kids should reduce the tea intake.

Which type of tea suits me most?

It depends. Frail people had better choose black tea with sugar or milk, which replenishes energy and nutrition; it is suggested teenager at the age of puberty drink more green tea; those on a diet ought to drink oolong tea.

What’s your thought on the 5 common senses about tea? Tell us on the comment section below.

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